Rediscovering Dickens

A chronicle of the transcription of 20 issues of Household Words by Charles Dickens.

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Location: Kansas City, Missouri, United States

I'm working on a pet project to digitize all of the issues of Charles Dickens's weekly magazine, Household Words, that contained portions of his novel Hard Times. Since OCR software is expensive, I'm transcribing all of 20 issues by hand. Since I am actually interested in what I am typing (and am therefore reading as I go), and I not the speediest of typists, this will take me a little while. This blog will chronicle my progress and my thoughts about the project and its content along the way. Why should you care? If you are at all interested in how popular culture evolves, how the middle class came to be, and how literature is affected within and without its context, you should read on. If you couldn't care less of such things, then you might want to go elsewhere. Thanks for visiting - I hope you will return. - Lynn

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Long time, no type. Eh, such is life in the big city. Now, on with the post, such as it is. Just some odds and ends.
  • I recently participated in the 2007 Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Conference in Kansas City, MO. Jennifer Phegley and I presented on our Household Words project, and I even made mention of this site. If you're visiting now because of the conference, welcome - thanks for stopping by! I provided tech support for the conference, so I didn't get to attend many of the sessions. What I did see was really quite interesting. I read several of the papers, so I did get some exposure to much of the content. Also, the food was fabulous.
  • Charles Dickens is getting some more exposure as of late, thanks to the recent announcement of the upcoming opening of Dickens World, a Charles Dickens-inspired theme park designed to bring a back a bit of Victorian England. According to a Boston Globe article, guests will have the opportunity to "see the Ghost of Christmas Past in Ebeneezer Scrooge's haunted house, be hectored by a schoolmaster at Dotheboys Hall -- the dismal school from "Nicholas Nickleby" -- and peer into the fetid cells of Newgate Prison." No word on whether women will be able to purchase their own consessions (own property) or if children will be employed to operate the roller coaster.